A Slice at a Time

During the grad school years I really grew to love Mexican food, so many meatless options and yet oh so tasty! While I loved the food I wasn’t so fond of cutting up all those leafy greens. I don’t have the best set of knives and it would take so much work to get through a few layers of green leaf.

One day when my younger sister was over I noticed she was using my kitchen scissors to make the salsa. She was just chatting away cutting two green onions at at time like it was no big deal-and I was totally geeking out in my head, I mean how did I not know this trick before?

Then a light went off, that would work for all my leafy greens I need chopped up. I’m always amazed at her ability to find faster and better ways to do things.  In my opinion this is both!

The very next time I made Pico de Gaillo I was amazed at how much faster, easier, and better the scissors cut. What used to take me a good 10 minutes to cut up took less than 3!  It also cut my prep time on Chicken Cilantro. For some reason getting the Cilantro to a good usable size takes me forever–sometimes perfectionism really doesn’t pay–but hey the scissors would save me another 10 minutes. Woot!

I know, I know, I’m a total geek over here but I adore time saved. I also love how evenly I can cut without putting my fingers in too much danger while also eliminating the need for a cutting board! One less dish to clean is always good in my book!

 

What’s your favorite time saving trick in the kitchen?

 

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  • Jessie

    Throw all your veggie and herb and garlic scraps in a bucket or largish Tupperware thing to keep in your freezer instead of in the trash. When it gets full, throw it in a pot with water and salt and pepper and more herbs and garlic and simmer on the back of the stove for a few hours while you do other stuff. Strain it and freeze your new free veggie stock that you can use as a base for soups but also instead of water to add flavor to rice or couscous.

    Yeah, it takes time on the stove, but it takes almost no other time because you would need to throw the scraps somewhere anyway, and now you’re using what would otherwise be wasted.

  • That’s a great idea! I never have stock on hand for when a recipe calls for it, but this is easy and efficient. I’ll have to try that!